Onion price surges in Nepal after India bans export

onion-price-surges-in-nepal-after-india-bans-export

, SEPTEMBER 15

in the has seen a steep hike just a day after India banned its export. The Indian government banned export of all varieties of onions yesterday, citing drop in production in the southern states due to excessive rainfall.

Traders in the domestic market hiked onion price by Rs 15 per kg in the wholesale market today.

According to the , the price of onion reached Rs 75 per kg today from Rs 60 a kg yesterday in the wholesale market.

The surge in onion price was even more pronounced in the retail markets.

Saraswati Shrestha, a retail vegetable vendor from Lubhu, was selling onion at Rs 90 per kg today, while yesterday she was charging Rs 70 a kg.

“I bought onions at Rs 80 per kg today at the wholesale market, so after keeping a margin of Rs 10 I am selling them at Rs 90 per kg,” she said, adding, “But I have heard that some vendors in Lubhu are charging up to Rs 100 a kg.”

Onion price in the domestic market saw a steep hike just a day after India banned its export. The Indian government banned export of all varieties of onions yesterday, citing drop in production in the southern states due to excessive rainfall.

Traders in domestic market hiked onion price by Rs 15 per kg in wholesale market today. As per the Kalimati Fruits and Development Committee, the price of onion reached Rs 75 per kg today from Rs 60 a kg yesterday in wholesale market.

The surge in onion price was even more pronounced in the retail markets.

Saraswati Shrestha, a retail vegetable vendor from Lubhu, was selling onion at Rs 90 per kg today, while yesterday she was charging Rs 70 a kg. “I bought onions at Rs 80 per kg today at wholesale market, so after keeping a margin of Rs 10 I am selling it at Rs 90 a kg,” she said. “But I heard some vendors in Lubhu are charging up to Rs 100 per kg.”

She claimed that there were wholesale traders at Kalimati who were selling onions at a higher price but she was lucky enough to get them at Rs 80 a kg.

“I can’t understand steep hike in wholesale price overnight.

Since we have to buy it at a higher rate in wholesale, the retail price is also going to be high,” she said. “India’s ban on onion export is a godsend opportunity for a few traders to make a quick buck.”

Meanwhile, Khom Prasad Ghimire, president of Federation of Fruits and Vegetable Entrepreneurs, blames traders for their wrong intention of hiking the price of onions overnight to earn more during this crisis. “It has become a trend in our country whereby traders take advantage of any crisis to raise the price of daily essentials,” he said. “All wholesalers always have stock for at least a week, hence, onions should be sold at the same price for at least that period.”

As there is no commercial production of onions in a large scale in , the domestic market has to depend on India for vegetables like onions, lemons and potatoes. Thus, any changes in Indian


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